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FACP. Colegio de médicos de Tarragona Nº 4305520 / fgcapriles@gmail.com

WORLD EMERGENCY MEDICINE SOCIETIES

iSepsis – Understanding Lactate

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miércoles, 1 de agosto de 2012

"Sales de baño"



Bath Salts: The Ivory Wave of Trouble
Olives T., Orozco B., Stellplug S. West J Emerg Med 2012; 13(1): 58-62
"Mephedrone and MDPV are both b-ketophenethylamine derivatives of cathinone, a compound isolated from the East African plant Catha edulis (khat, qat). Mephedrone is commonly referred to as plant food, MCAT, 4-MMC, meow meow, meph, and drone; MDPV is commonly called MTV, MDPK, Magic, and Super Coke. Both are structurally similar to amphetamines, with mephedrone sharing close similarities with methamphetamine and MDPV with ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA). Bath salts pose an increasing public health risk in the United States, with reports of toxicity and mortality increasing along with calls to poison centers throughout the United States. Packages labeled with innocuous monikers such as White Ice, Ivory Wave, Ocean Snow, Lunar Wave, and Vanilla Sky intentionally belie the dangerous substances within, which are by no means intended to replace legitimate bath products. The white or tan crystalline powder commonly is administered by nasal insufflation or oral ingestion; however, rectal suppository and less commonly, intramuscular or intravenous injection, are also reported. A movement to ban these substances is growing in the United States, following similar actions in Europe. Although successfully outlawed in some locales, this movement has not eliminated the public health hazards posed by mephedrone or MDPV. Emergency physicians (EP) should thus be knowledgeable in the epidemiology of bath salt abuse, the clinical toxidrome with which bath salt toxicity presents, and appropriate treatment strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients presenting with bath salt toxicity."