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SOBRE EL AUTOR **

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FACP. Colegio de médicos de Tarragona Nº 4305520 / fgcapriles@gmail.com

WORLD EMERGENCY MEDICINE SOCIETIES

Rapid IJ (aka Easy Internal Jugular Cannulation)

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sábado, 12 de diciembre de 2015

Nauseas (tratamiento)

Resultado de imagen de Annals of emergency Medicine
Poster presentation at the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors Academic Assembly, Phoenix, AZ, April 13, 2015; and poster presentation at the American College of Emergency Physicians Scientific Assembly, October 27, 2015. Lee K, Helbling A, Love S, April M & Hunter D
"A convenience sample of adults with chief complaints of nausea or vomiting was enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in an urban tertiary care ED. Patients were randomized to nasally inhaled isopropyl alcohol versus nasally inhaled normal saline solution. Patient nausea and pain were measured with previously published 11-point verbal numeric response scale scores; patient satisfaction was measured by a 5-point Likert scale. The primary outcome was reduction in nausea 10 minutes poststart. Secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction and pain reduction measured at 10 minutes poststart.
Conclusion
We found that nasally inhaled isopropyl alcohol achieves increased nausea relief compared with placebo during a 10-minute period."
http://www.annemergmed.com/article/S0196-0644(15)01361-X/abstract
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Boring EM - Posted by eve Purdy on 2014, 08, 25
Title: Antiemetic use for nausea and vomiting in adult emergency department patients: randomized controlled trial comparing ondansetron, metoclopramide, and placebo. PMID: 24818542
"This week we review an article comparing ondasetron, metoclopramide and placebo (normal saline).
Nausea and/or vomiting are common emergency department (ED) presentations. While investigating underlying cause and establishing a diagnosis are important, so too is the goal of relieving the patient’s symptoms. This paper evaluates two commonly prescribed anti-emetic medications and placebo in a head-to-head comparison for the treatment of ED patients with nausea and/or vomiting.
Bottom Line
IV ondansetron and metoclopramide are no better than placebo at improving patient perceptions of nausea and vomiting along a visual analogue scale but all three provide a clinically significant improvement in symptoms."
http://boringem.org/2014/08/25/ondansetron-vs-placebo/