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FACP. Colegio de médicos de Tarragona Nº 4305520 / fgcapriles@gmail.com

WORLD EMERGENCY MEDICINE SOCIETIES

Rapid IJ (aka Easy Internal Jugular Cannulation)

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domingo, 4 de diciembre de 2016

GI Bleeds

emDocs - December 3, 2016 - By Thorngren C and Welch J. 
Edited by: Simon E and Koyfman A
"Developing a clinical gestalt regarding a patient with a gastrointestinal bleed (GIB) can be challenging even for the seasoned emergency medicine physician. Anecdotally, we’ve all heard of the hemodynamically stable patient with one bloody bowel movement prior to arrival that acutely decompensates in the ED. While the decision to admit these patients to the ward versus the ICU may be clear in the setting of unstable VS or post endotracheal intubation, there are often times when we encounter shades of gray. The following discussion will hopefully shed some light on topic, and offer a quick discussion of risk stratification methods for EM physicians to utilize when addressing upper and lower GI bleeds...
Conclusion
Extensive research has been performed in an attempt to develop clinical decision-making tools for the risk stratification of patients with GI bleeds. Ultimately, patients who are hemodynamically unstable, risk stratify as having a high mortality secondary to GI bleeding, or are at risk for having a severe lower GI bleed, should be admitted to an ICU setting."