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FACP. Colegio de médicos de Tarragona Nº 4305520 / fgcapriles@gmail.com

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Friday, January 29, 2021

ETCO2 in CPR

AAEMRSA (Resident Journal Review) - January 21, 2021 - By Christianna Sim; Taylor Conrad; Taylor M. Douglas; Wesley Chan. Editors: Kelly Maurelusmand Kami. 
Originally published: Common Sense . November/December 2020
“Question: How can end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring guide our management of cardiac arrest?
Answer: In the management of patients with cardiac arrest and a definitive airway, a persistent ETCO2 of <10 mmHg, despite maximal resuscitative efforts, is associated with lack of ROSC, while an abrupt increase in ETCO2 of 10 mmHg or greater may be reliably indicative of ROSC. It remains that existing studies do not clearly account for confounding variables to clearly define a threshold to be the single deciding factor as to whether to stop or continue ACLS. Similarly, depth of chest compressions is associated with ETCO2 levels, but there remains no set number or guide by which to adjust chest compressions during cardiac arrest.”