Síguenos en Twitter     Síguenos en Facebook     Síguenos en YouTube     Siguenos en Linkedin     Correo Grupsagessa     Gmail     Dropbox     Instagram     Google Drive     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon     StumbleUpon

SOBRE EL AUTOR **

My photo
FACP. Colegio de médicos de Tarragona Nº 4305520 / fgcapriles@gmail.com

WORLD EMERGENCY MEDICINE SOCIETIES & RELATED

Search

Content:

Monday, January 3, 2022

Facial Fractures

TAMING THE SRU
TAMING THE SRU - January 03, 2022 - By Charlie Brower
“In the setting of maxillofacial trauma, airway compromise and severe hemorrhage are the most common life-threatening complications. 
Ensuring airway patency is of the utmost importance in patients with maxillofacial trauma as up to 42% of patients with severe maxillofacial trauma require intubation. (4) Airway compromise most commonly occurs due to soiling of the airway (significant hemorrhage or emesis) and obstruction (posteriorly displaced tongue, soft tissue injury and swelling, or other foreign bodies such as dislodged teeth).
When considering airway interventions, providers should anticipate difficulty in bag-mask ventilation as distorted facial anatomy can prevent adequate mask seal (particularly in Le Fort II and III fractures). If bag-mask ventilation becomes difficult, consider using a supraglottic airway device as a bridge to a definitive airway…